The Horrific Violent Imagery of the BDSM Illustrator Joseph Farrel (61 Pics)
12 februari 2021 

The Horrific Violent Imagery of the BDSM Illustrator Joseph Farrel (61 Pics)

In an interview the provocative film director Bruno Dumont once explained about his work that “The landscape is a reflection of the inner life. Since I can’t shoot the inner life, all I can shoot is the exterior but I know that when I’m filming outside, I’m filming inside. I can only really touch the inside through the mise-en-scene. So through the mise-en-scene of the outside we can explore the inside

Joseph Farrel Humiliations cover

Most Scandalous Since de Sade

The above quote came to my mind when I was introduced to the work of Joseph Farrel (1934). The daring tableaux of this French artist (Farrel is a pseudonym), whose work is described by the columnist, actor and admirer Christophe Bier ‘as the most scandalous since that of de Sade‘, have the same starting point. Farrel’s provocative drawings are far from the clichés of SM eroticism. He portrays a nightmarish, grotesque world, where the female body undergoes a whole lot of torture using terrifying devices.

Joseph Farrel kink art

Beyond Allowable Limits

Without taboos or limits, Farrel explores an outrageous sadism where traditional values ​​are trampled on (such as marriage and family). Social satire is never very far away. In Farrel’s universe there’s no playful SM between consenting people. Here, the humiliated and tortured women are mortified without their consent. One can find this extreme genre to be beyond the allowable limits, but since these are fantasies written down on paper, aren’t fantasies, by definition, limitless – except by the imagination?

Joseph Farrel dildo

Understand the Artist

To better understand his work and imagination we’ve to better understand the artist. Farrel has always led a secluded discreet life, with his wife. Although he was (maybe still is) a practicing sadomasochist, who frequently visited BDSM clubs in Paris, built a lot of play instruments such as paddles, crops or wooden dildo’s, his real life was nothing like the dark fantasies portrayed in his drawings. For the self-taught Farrel, drawing has always been an outlet, in which he could express a violence he didn’t want to experience in real life. For instance, he is a big fan of horror movies but can’t stand the sight of blood at the same time. Therefore, it’s important to distinguish the man and his fantasies.

Joseph Farrel kink bdsm

Creative Power

Part of the strength of Farrel’s work is that he never drew to make a living. He produced his drawings for his own pleasure. That’s why he never sought to get out of the dying network of sex shops and didn’t regret his removal from the publisher’s world. Another element that makes his work so forceful is his creative power. The focus is on the erotic tension, the elaborate care to draw facial expressions, the significance of including a third person, a witness or contributor, who will fortify the humiliation of the victim.

Joseph Farrel bondage art

Eroticism of Depravity

The compositions are set up in such a way that they evoke maximum arousal for the reader, in which Farrel attaches importance to every detail. He is absorbed in the eroticism of depravity and pain, which really has nothing seductive to it and yet can be very arousing. He then uses his dark humor as a further weapon of humiliation, cruelty and hopelessness. The most horrifying erotic cruelty seem to happen by chance, often  we see elated torturers but also more subdued peeping Toms, all of them insensitive toward the pain they cause. This downplays the violence making it even more unbearable.

violent erotica Joseph Farrel

Impressive Nihilism

Although social commentary is not his starting point it is inherently there, because Farrel is inspired only by what surrounds him. The characters and settings are taken from direct experience. In an earlier interview Bier explains about Farrel’s motives the following, ‘He only draws to arouse himself and his audience: that’s his only concern. The only message that can be drawn from his work would be to try and confront his fantasies without the slightest fear, to go like him to the core of an idea, however frightening it may be. His nihilism is impressive, but what is truly magnificent is his creative strength to face it. He does not always come unharmed: he weeps over his drawings.’

Joseph Farrel erotic art

Sex Shops

Farrel produced nine books that were, because of its strong content, mainly sold through sex shops and adult book stores in limited editions. He was most prolific in the 1980s. The titles of these can be found at the bottom of this article.

I guess that if you’ve read until this point you’re not among the easily offended and ready to explore Farrel’s work even further.

Read ‘em and weep…

Joseph Farrel bondage

molestation joseph farrel

joseph farrel nipples

bdsm artist joseph farrel

Joseph Farrel Humiliation

Joseph Farrel Anal Humiliations

Joseph Farrel drinking pee

Joseph Farrel BDSM

Joseph Farrel interracial

Joseph Farrel BDSM art

joseph farrel huge breasts

Joseph Farrel blowpipe

torture bdsm art

Joseph Farrel erotic

Joseph Farrel breasts

bondage joseph farrel

Joseph Farrel dark erotica

Joseph Farrel de Sade

Joseph Farrel shock bdsm

Joseph Farrel Kinky art

Joseph Farrel extreme bdsm

Joseph Farrel anal sex

tits erotic art

Joseph Farrel violent art

bdsm art joseph farrel

Joseph Farrel art

Joseph Farrel torture

Joseph Farrel extreme kink art

Joseph Farrel sadistic

Joseph Farrel drawing

Joseph Farrel torturing

Joseph Farrel torture art

Joseph Farrel tied female

Humiliation joseph Farrel

Joseph Farrel gang rape

bdsm art joseph farrel mistress

Joseph Farrel Humiliations book

Joseph Farrel Breast art

Joseph Farrel party

Joseph Farrel shibari

Joseph Farrel tied woman

Joseph Farrel rape

erotic joseph farrel

 

Joseph Farrel uncensored

Joseph Farrel artist

Bibliography:

 Obéis! Sinon (Obey! if not…) (1977)
Parfums de souffrance (Perfumes of Suffering aka.Painful Flavours) (1978)
Humiliations (1980)
Couleurs de sang (Blood color) (1982)
Douleurs Fugitives (Fugitive pain) (1983)
Le Rendez-vous de Sodomal (The meeting of Sodomal) (1984)
Les Seins Torturés (Tortured breasts) (1988)
Juex cruels (Cruel games) (1993)
Pourquai pleurent-elles? (Why are they crying?) (2012)

Obesi sinon joseph farrel

Front cover of the book ‘Obéis Sinon (Obey! if not…) ‘ (1977)

parfums de souffrance cover Joseph Farrel

Front cover of the book ‘Parfums de souffrance (Painful Flavours)‘ (1978)

Joseph Farrel Humiliations

Front cover of the book ‘Humiliations’ (1980)

Couleur Sang Jose[h Farrel

Front cover of the book ‘Couleur de Sang (Blood Color)‘ (1982)

Douleurs Fugitives Joseph Farrel

Front cover of the book ‘Douleurs Fugitives (Fugitive pain)‘ (1983)

Le Rendez Vous de Sodomal

Front cover of the book ‘Le Rendez-Vous de Sodomal (The Meeting of Sodomal)‘ (1984)

Les Seins Torturés Joseph Farrel

Front cover of the book ‘Le Seins Torturés (Tortured Breasts)‘ (1988)

Jeux Cruels Joseph Farrel

Front cover of the book  ‘Jeux Cruels (Cruel Games)‘ (1993)

Pourquoi pleurent elles?

Front cover of the book  ‘Pourquai pleurent-elles? (Why are they crying?)‘ (2012)

Click HERE for more articles on BDSM art….!!

Sources: Ayzad.com, Christophe Bier, Zwiggelaar Auctions, Biblio.com, Rakuten, Eurobuch, bdewm.blogspot.com.

Do you share our opinion that Farrel is a significant artist or not? Leave your reaction in the comment box below….!!
About the author
Marijn is the founder of shungagallery.com. With more than 20 years of experience within the sensual and erotic art of shunga he is an authority in the genre. During this time he served many customers with complementing their art collection.
JB
By

JB

on 12 February 2021

In one word? Sick(ending!) BDSM is in great part what makes gives all depictions of sex and erotica a bad name, a verboten subject. There are several, but mainly two aspects of BDSM: the one, albeit still of no interest to me, that takes part between consenting parties, and the one in this article, that is nothing but a branch of humiliation and torture. Although the first might be to some people acceptable, and we can discuss at length what it involves, why it might even have aesthetic value, the second is purely trash - Farrell's case, and artistically speaking, his work is also very low quality. Art? I'm afraid not. A parallel can be drawn also with zoophilia and bestiality. There are a few art pieces that involve zoophilia and bestiality that are art. The most known being Hokusai's Tako to Ama. Less known, are the work series of Mel Ramos of which "Ocelot" is my favorite. If Hokusai's is often translated into "The dream of the fisherman's wife," Ramos could be titled "The dream of the zookeeper's wife." The bestiality in Gamiani, however, to mention but one example, as far as I am concerned, has already crossed the line into trash, regardless of the artist. BDSM standing for Bondage / Discipline / Dominance / Submission / Sadism / Masochism, the only aesthetic value of it is in bondage when, again, it involves consenting parties and no violence is involved. Araki's kinbaku is probably the best known of all, the same way that as far as BDSM is concerned, I can think only of one name worth looking at: Tomi Ungerer. (I'm thinking of his work published in Fornikon and Erotoscope) for example. There might be others I'm not familiar with. So, in conclusion, Farrel to me is/was not an artist, or artisan. Maybe he was a poor illustrator at best? I see only a sick mind in the images included in this article, fodder for other sick minds. Yes, the mise-en-scene reflects his inner world. And yes, "horrific" is a good way to describe his depictions of his inner world, but falls short, because even what is horrific, bizarre, can be aesthetically appealing. (Giger comes to mind, to mention but one) but not Farrel.

MK
By

MK

on 12 February 2021

The author warned you about the content and BDSM, as defined, but I do not think it fair to say: "Farrel, was not an artist, or artisan", simply from the content he uses to portray. Farrel's pencil work is extremely beautiful. He is able to capture texture and idea in his many scenes. The use of 'erotic depravity' in relatable themes, because anyone experiencing Farrel's art is forced to position themselves in uncomfortable feelings of where they personally stand in the view. Farrel's work is not designed for the squeemish and I think the author provided that disclaimer. Art and Eroticism is not separated by the viewer the artistic intent is crafted through the medium, skill and narrative that the artist chooses to portray. The context also plays a role which means; who is the audience? and when is the work being created? and how is it distributed? Using Giger as example is more a matter of taste or perspective than a comparison. But I won't get into that here.

JB
By

JB

on 12 February 2021

I have no problem with Marijn including any content whatsoever here, very much the contrary, I welcome it. As far as what is and is not art, it's all a matter of opinion and personal taste, and I claim nothing more. My comments are always just that, my own. Farrel, as far as I am concerned, was poor at his craft. That his pencil work has quality, and texture, is, again, just a matter of opinion. To me, it doesn't. Not even close. But that is the beauty of life: everyone has the right to experience things in their own way, and to have, and equally express, their opinions, especially when invited to do so, which is the case here. :)

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 12 February 2021

Thanks for your critique JB. I'm always curious about your thoughts. To me Farrel is a rare artist who, because he makes no concessions and is not afraid to explore the darkest recesses of his fantasy, intentionally or unintentionally (probably both) represents an expression that is close to exploitation (in your words trash) but still evokes enough intrigue and aesthetics not to be categorized as such. His work reminds me of Pasolini's Salo (still one of the most intolerable works of art I have ever seen) which has the same inexorable atmosphere (also exploring de Sade)and kicks you in the stomach but with reason. It takes you to a place where you don't want to be but which, if you examine your thoughts, can give you new insights. The drawings of Farrel are not arousing to me, but they evoke some kind of emotion and fascination. His drawings are (and were) not intended for a large audience. But initially only for himself. Partly because of this, his work has an authenticity that is quite unique and in my opinion goes beyond pornography.. Although I myself do not belong to his specific target group , I am still fascinated by his work. I think his drawing skill (which is off course a matter of taste) also contributes to this. Anyway, his portrayals will leave few people indifferent.

JB
By

JB

on 12 February 2021

To keep this short: To compare Farrel to Pier Paolo Pasolini would never occur to me; I understand the way you put it, but to me, that would be to compare dead cosmic debris to the sun. Just to clarify: Farrell's work does not kick me in the stomach at all; it's just dead, like inert, lifeless matter. If I find a carcass in the woods, I don't walk away from it. The stench does not bother me. I usually fiddle with it, I am curious, because decaying matter usually brings about life; maggots, bugs, ants, etc., thrive in it. It's fascinating. Not Farrell's work.

Alexandre Rodrigues da Costa
By

Alexandre Rodrigues da Costa

on 12 February 2021

In a word? Fantastic. It's absurd that there are still people who don't distinguish between reality and representation and condemn an artist for express his imagination on a two-dimensional surface by means of strokes that resemble human figures. Joseph Farrel's work is as wonderful as that of Hans Bellmer or Hiroaki Samura with his book Love Of The Brute.

JB
By

JB

on 12 February 2021

Let's agree on disagreeing! Farrel compared to and placed side-by-side with Hans Beller? Please, spare me the heartache! I have several pieces by Bellmer in my collection of erotica, and Andre Mason, etc., and would not want anything by Farrel even close. Unless I one day decide to collect what I call trash, just to bring out in an even stronger way the value and quality of those art pieces. But to each its own. It's your prerogative to bundle them all together, if you want, it's mine to keep them well apart. If you consider my opinion absurd, must I also consider yours absurd? Well, I'd rather not, because it's your opinion. Shall we just agree on disagreeing? :)

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 12 February 2021

Thanks a lot Alexandre, I'm pleased you enjoyed the article.

Kesdee
By

Kesdee

on 21 May 2021

For me, as fine as Bellmer or Samura, or even Bernhart. There is good art and bad art. It's subjective. What is being portrayed (the subject) is often the attack point, not the quality. Farrel, for me, anyway, is a major artist.

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 22 May 2021

Thanks for your reaction Kesdee.

- MK
By

- MK

on 12 February 2021

Joseph Farrel's work is spine tingling, it makes my hair stand on end as well as other things. The topics position you in the room as if you are standing, in place, watching the scene this is what makes the images ultimately attractive even if you don't agree with the taboo topic being portrayed. The images force your emotions to react especially with the erotic content, you either look because you want to or look because you can't help yourself. Which in essence becomes the same thing, only the duration of the look is what may be different. Even if you become disgusted one has to be amazed at how visceral pencil on paper can be.

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 12 February 2021

Thanks MK. Indeed, both Farrel and de Sade used the pencil each in their own way to express their subversive views.

Darya
By

Darya

on 12 February 2021

Well, we, certainly, should distinguish the real person and his art, but we also should distinguish art and therapy. What Marijn describes here is rather the therapy than the art. These drawings push the limits of morality/esthetics and so on, but they don't push the limits of visual art, in my opinion. Thank you for the article! Your in-depth study and the bibliographic list at the end of this post are impressive.

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 12 February 2021

Thanks Darya. Yes, while I think Farrel is an artist of importance, I'm not saying he's on an equal footing in impact and influence as a Pasolini or de Sade. If his drawings (like you say) push the limits of morality and aesthetics than he made a worthy contribution after all. I'm pleased you enjoyed the article!

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