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Copulating Couple Hidden Behind a Tsuitate by Koryusai

In the penultimate eleventh plate from Isoda Koryusai‘s oban-sized album ‘Shikido torikumi juniban ( Twelve Bouts on the Way of Sensuality),’* we watch a couple in an intimate embrace on a futon.

Tsuitate

The woman’s obi** is hanging casually over a tsuitate***, that is decorated with a design of cranes, a common motif in Japanese art. Tsuitate were usually medium height (about 120 cm) and, like folding screens, were used to subdivide larger rooms.

To Obscure

Although this type of screen may seem rather low, they are high enough to obscure the people on the other side of the screen when sitting on the floor or lying down, as in this design.

couple behind tsuitate by Koryusai

Couple behind a tsuitate‘ (c.1775) from the series ‘Shikido torikumi juniban ( Twelve Bouts on the way of Sensuality)‘ by Isoda Koryusai (1735-1790)

Removable

Tsuitate were designed in various types, some being more transparent than others. They were made of wood or bamboo and sometimes has removable parts, which could be changed along with the seasons.

Click HERE for another striking design from this series…!!

Source: ‘Japanese Erotic Prints – Shunga by Harunobu & Koryusai‘  by Inge Klompmakers

 

*Shikido torikumi juniban‘ is a groundbreaking shunga album issued between 1775 and 1777, including designs with bold compositions in which the portrayed figures almost fill the entire image. This was clearly intended  to focus the viewer’s attention on the lovers in the image. The prints of this series, which are compelling and energetic, also breathe a more pornographic atmosphere than Koryusai’s earlier designs.

**obi is a traditional Japanese sash
***tsuitate (lit. ‘upright stands’) is a form of single-panel portable partition traditionally used in Japan since at least the 6th century.

If you have any inquiries or suggestions please don’t hesitate to leave a reaction in the comment box below….!!

About the author
Darya

By

Darya

on 19 February 2020

Thank you! Reading about Japanese interior one can understand that there is not so much of private space really.

Marijn

By

Marijn

on 19 February 2020

Thanks Darya, the lack of privacy is nicely illustrated by the artist Shigenobu in his The Floating Bridge of Heaven series (1830), The man pinching his nose is highly amusing...!!

Darya

By

Darya

on 19 February 2020

he's so beautifully tattooed!

Marijn

By

Marijn

on 19 February 2020

Yes, and subtly displayed by Shigenobu.

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