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19 March 2020 

Seven X-Rated Adventures As Imagined by Jeff Faerber

In anticipation of Jeff Faerber‘s last “creative burp” (that will pay homage to the Japanese masters Eisen and Hokusai), we take a look today at seven works from the past that have never been seen before on this stage.

The seven X-rated adventures are depicted in chronological order, so that we can closely follow his evolution in style…

Reclining Couple, with Bonzai Tree, Girl Twittering

A brief respite [in a discussion of Keynesian as it relates to GDP] for gastronomic and erogenous indulgences

Study (done after the fact) for Paramours with Steamed Dumplings Flirting with Small Death

Study (after the fact) for Girl with Suitor, Listening to Radiohead (no.4)

Girl with Suitor, Listening to Radiohead

An Irishman and a Scorpio release pent up tension built from a disagreement about the efficacy at a rubik’s cube to illustrate a metaphor for certification

The courtship intensifies, as the courtesan is enveloped with pleasure at the serendipity of a Squirtle and Lickitung, a Poké Ball firmly grasped in hand, and the thrill of the hunt

Click HERE for many other inspiring articles that delve deeper into the art of Jeff Faerber….!!

We are a fan of the artist’s work and not an affiliate but you can find his available shunga art by clicking here….!!

What are your thoughts on modern shunga? Join the discussion below…!! 

About the author
Marijn is the founder of shungagallery.com. With more then 20 years of experience within the sensual and erotic art of shunga he is an authority in the genre. During this time he served many customers with complementing their art collection.
Darya
By

Darya

on 19 March 2020

Kimono patterns in the last piece are very beautiful!

Marijn
JB
By

JB

on 20 March 2020

JF's work don't even reach the bottom of the list of what (I personally of course) consider Shunga, let alone good Shunga. One may of course call Shunga anything one likes, but this ain't it. His work lacks the finesse and aesthetic qualities of Shunga. This is drawn porn influenced (no, not inspired, it lacks inspiration,) by Shunga, and nothing else. Most modern "Shunga" in fact fall under this category. I'm yet to see anything done these days that can truly be qualified 春画. It's however one of the reasons I frequent your site: it's one of the very few, if not only one, that makes available all shorts of Shunga, wannabe Shunga (or maybe we can call them "minor shunga") and allow one to compare and sort it all out: the good, the bad and the ugly.

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 20 March 2020

Thanks for your comments JB. Although taste is elusive, I respectfully disagree with you. In past articles I have talked about what I like about Faerber's art so I won't repeat it here but whether you don't like his aesthetics in comparison to ancient shunga or not it's hard to dispute the displayed skill of the artist when it concerns drawing style. But to avoid falling into this discussion I wondered: Which artist is in your opinion a true (modern) shunga artist that meets your standards? How do you qualify for instance the work of Senju" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://shungagallery.com/senju-shunga/">Senju Shunga? Anyhow, I am pleased you appreciate our platform as a way to discern your preferences.

Darya
By

Darya

on 20 March 2020

Marijn, I think that Jeff's works can be considered as an interesting experiment, a variation on the theme so to say. For further reflection, one needs to answer what shunga is. Til now it can't be defined whether shunga is an art form or just a kind of pornography that was drawn by such masters as Hokusai just because it could be sold (as we're still debating on Nabokov's 'Lolita', for instance: it was written because Nabokov expressed himself, or he just needed money and chose a theme that could be sold). Okay, let's suppose that the answer is clear: truly talented people can turn into art everything, even things that were originally done for money and commercial success. But still it can't be denied that shunga itself 'lacks' inspiration (the same setting, the same poses appear again and again,( in spite of the fact that Shuncho, Hokusai, Shigenobu and Kanenari were absolutely crazy in terms of their shunga themes and always pushed the limits), so one can yet have an impression that shunga prints were created 'for food'). But I can understand why modern (especially Western) attempts sometimes can receive a negative reaction: maybe the reason in a specific Eastern artistic approach, philosophic and meditative, so every piece of Hokusai has a very balanced harmonic composition, smooth lines, masterful patterns... Speaking of patterns: one of key features of shunga for me is chiseled patterns, which create an impression that you look at a collage, but not at a print. So shunga involves special drawing techniques, and maybe Klimt with his golden accents is really close to shunga in his works (I see it in some paintings by Senju). Another reason is the fact that every attempt to repeat something, whether it will be Praxiteles or Hokusai or Ovidius or Shakespeare, will be no more than a parody, so even if I learn how to copy Hokusai's style, I won't be a modern shunga painter, I will be an imitator. To me it's a tough question what can really be considered as 'modern shunga'.

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 20 March 2020

Thanks for your extensive reaction Darya. I agree Jeff's work is a modern variation on shunga including contemporary and ancient elements. As for the ambiguity of whether shunga is an art form or an ancient form of pornography, I would definitely go for the first one if only because it influenced and inspired so many great artists from the 19th and 20th centuries. At the time shunga (and ukiyo-e in general) was not considered an art form but over the centuries it evolved as such. But within this "limitation" they could experiment and develop their own aesthetics. Also, I think that money as a decisive factor is a problem. All people involved in ukiyo-e (artists, publishers, carvers..etc.) followed the market's needs. So if we would extend this line Hokusai's The" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://shungagallery.com/hokusais-the-great-wave/">The Great Wave could also not be part of the pantheon of great art. If the involvement of money determines whether something is art or not, many artists would drop out (think of Rembrandt, Michelangelo or Andy Warhol and his Factory). To me, modern shunga is a broad concept. In my experience, it includes all art that is inspired or influenced by shunga.

Darya
By

Darya

on 20 March 2020

Yes, the commercial factor is not a key one in terms of defining whether something is the art or not, but the level of performance is, by all means, a crucial thing if we try to classify some production. Shunga is the art, cause Japanese masters had high standards so to say, as they were studying fine art during their lifetime. JB, as I understand, wants to see here something totally equal to old masters in terms of talent and performance, and doesn't like some sort of contrast between the works of people who devoted their lives to ukiyo-e and the works of Jeff, who looks like an amateur being published next to Hokusai, Kunisada and others. I can understand JB, but I also love your democratic approach, as the works of Jeff are a way to pay respect to Japanese artists, are a way of adoration for their talent. And it's great that their works are stimulating someone to do something, as to do for every artist means to improve the skill. So, we're (at least me) welcoming new works by Jeff!

JB
By

JB

on 20 March 2020

Darya, not at all. You misunderstood what I wrote. Just read my reply to Marijn, just posted. I don;t want anything banned or eliminated from the Shunga Gallery. In fact, very much the contrary! Even the least fortunate and awkward "attempts at Shunga" as I might call them (and JF's fall under this classification,) are welcome here and I am glad Marijn brings them to this website. In fact, it's in many cases by looking at such failed attempts (and again let me repeat it even if ad nauseam: this is my personal opinion,) that we can realize fully how absolutely amazing and valuable the works of the masters --- both of old and present --- are! How would one say that a tree is taller than another, magnificent, if but for the shorter ones?

JB
By

JB

on 20 March 2020

Marijn, yes, taste is subjective and a personal thing. I consider JF's drawing/painting skills poor. His aesthetics even worse, but subjectivity is exactly why I wrote "personally of course" in my previous comment. As for modern artists doing Shunga, here are two I highly rank: 1. Senju, yes, of course. I have a number of his works. 2. Gudmundur Erro; have you heard of him? If not, Google "Gudmundur Erro - Made in Japan" and that series/set of 7 lithos will come up (I was lucky enough to get hold of a set a while back.) I have both books Senju published (okaasanbooks.com) and there are a few artists in The Secret Garden that I like. Last but certainly not least, there are some good erotica out there, and artists that I like, but not all would fall (again, for me, of course,) under the umbrella of "Shunga." Regardless of taste, and what one likes or does not like, your website is a good repository or all things Shunga and "shungish" and a unique place to discuss the subject, it's variations and even failures at trying to emulate the genre. Thank you for your work!

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 21 March 2020

Thanks Darya!

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 21 March 2020

Thanks for your follow-up JB. Yes, the two artists you mention are also great examples of "modern shunga" artists although it was a "one-time event" for Erro as far as I know. As indicated by Darya below I paid attention to his shunga art in an earlier" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://shungagallery.com/gudmundur-erro/">earlier post. Again thanks for your participation to the discussion (it calls for a forum!) and I am pleased you enjoy our content!

Dave
By

Dave

on 24 March 2020

I have to congratulate you on the detail of the Male ‘Junk’ in all drawings. The Female Genitalia is quite outstanding too....!

Marijn
By

Marijn

on 24 March 2020

Thanks Dave. Yes, Faerber clearly adopted that specific feature from the classical shunga and made it his own..!!

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